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Centre for Earth Sciences

A Statistical Solution for the Water Management Predicament

Global Climate Models (GCMs) are mathematical models to understand and predict the Earth’s climate by projecting the real-world processes over time. These simulation tools help to predict future climate variables that will be useful to develop sustainable long, medium and short-term water resource planning strategies. A new study by a team of scientists - Prof. D. Nagesh Kumar from the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore and Prof. K. Srinivasa Raju from BITS-Pilani, Hyderabad campus, has analyzed numerous available GCMs to choose the best that would be applicable in the Indian context. Such analysis helps in developing the best resource planning strategies and the best climate models that can be used for localized needs.

Life, the Universe and Everything!

Scientists estimate that our Solar System is 4.567 billion years old. But, have you ever wondered how it was formed? How did the planets take shape from the initial gas and dust of the solar nebula and eventually, how did life evolve on Earth? What processes shaped the initial evolution of our Solar System? These fundamental questions drive Prof. Ramananda Chakrabarti and the researchers in his lab at the Center for Earth Sciences, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, to study rocks on Earth and from space.

Scientists Study Composition of Bengaluru’s Rain

Bengaluru, apart from all its glory, is also loved for its pleasant weather and surprise light showers. But what makes up the raindrops in those beautiful showers? Are these raindrops formed when fresh river water evaporates and become clouds? Do salt water bodies like seas and oceans influence the constituents of the raindrops that fall in Bengaluru? A team from the Centre for Earth Sciences (CEaS) and Divecha Centre for Climate Change at the Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru is exploring this relationship between rain and the role of ocean in driving it. Prof. Prosenjit Ghosh, a member of the study team and a Professor at the Centre for Earth Sciences, calls this research “the journey of moisture from ocean to the land".

Life, the Universe and Everything!

Scientists estimate that our Solar System is 4.567 billion years old. But, have you ever wondered how it was formed? How did the planets take shape from the initial gas and dust of the solar nebula and eventually, how did life evolve on Earth? What processes shaped the initial evolution of our Solar System? These fundamental questions drive Prof. Ramananda Chakrabarti and the researchers in his lab at the Center for Earth Sciences, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, to study rocks on Earth and from space.

Managing Irrigation through Remote Sensing

Agriculture is the single largest contributor to India’s economy and the most important factor that drives this sector, is the availability of water resources. Prof. D. Nagesh Kumar of Indian Institute of Science is working on finding better ways of managing irrigation sources through Remote Sensing data.

More evidence for India Madagascar connections

Did you know that millions of years ago, all the land on this earth was part of a single huge supercontinent? Look carefully at the world map and you will notice that different continents fit together like a jigsaw puzzle. Now you know why.

Limestone growth in Himalayan caves: potential earthquake recorders?

Earthquakes are one of the most commonly occurring natural disasters, which have devastated the lives of many millions worldwide. There have been various studies done to identify, classify and forecast earthquakes. In one such study, researchers from JNCASR and IISc have examined limestone deposits inside caves of the Kumaun Himalaya, and discovered that deformations in the limestone can indeed indicate occurrences of past earthquakes.

What climate change will do to the Kashmir Himalayan vegetation by the end of the century

Among the 35 biodiversity hotspots located across globe, The Himalaya is home to the world’s highest mountains and pristine landscapes which harbour a huge biodiversity. The unique climate and topographic regimes allow it to support a plethora of species. However, climate change especially rising temperatures pose a significant threat to this highly fragile montane ecosystem. This makes investigations on the possible impacts of climate change on this region of particular interest to environmentalists and conservationists. Such an investigation undertaken by Irfan Rashid from the Department of Earth Sciences, University of Kashmir in collaboration with a team of scientists from the Indian Institute of Science (Bangalore) and Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University (Hyderabad), yields a very interesting view of the future of this region.

The Nepal Earthquake: Why did it happen and why now?

Earthquakes in Nepal above 4 magnitude in the past week.

More than 3000 people have been reported dead, after a massive earthquake hit Nepal on Saturday. This is the major earthquake tragedy in the region since the Bihar earthquake in 1934, which measured 8.2 on the Richter scale and caused over 10,000 fatalities. Why did this quake happen, and why now? In a paper published in February, a team of scientists from the Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research (JNCASR) and Indian Institute of Science (IISc) Bangalore, discussed why the region is prone to earthquakes and warned about the possibility of an imminent event.

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