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Department of Aerospace Engineering

Scientists leverage the power of shockwaves and antibiotics to treat bacterial infections

Many lifesaving medical devices such as urinary catheters, pacemakers, intrauterine devices and voice prosthesis, which are usually inserted into some part of the body, are plagued by a common problem – ‘bacterial biofilms’. These ‘biofilms’ grow on the surfaces of these devices and may cause infections. They are harder to treat than individual bacteria and need about 1000 – 10000 times stronger dose of antibiotics. But this may no longer be the case, as a group of scientists led by Prof. Dipshikha Chakravortty and Prof. Jagadeesh Gopalan from the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, have found a novel method to fight biofilm infections.

 

Researchers Develop Automation Tools to Help Treatment of Tumors

Tumors are often linked to cancer when they become malignant and start to spread. Doctors and researchers throughout the world are continuously seeking better ways to diagnose and treat tumors early on, thus preventing severe damage. In a rare interdisciplinary study, engineers from the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, have stepped up to help doctors in treating tumors. Prof. Radhakant Padhi from the Department of Aerospace Engineering and his team has designed an automation tool for slow and controlled drug release. It is an intelligent feedback algorithm that can be embedded in a micro-controller and effective in treating solid tumors with minimal side effects.

Researchers Develop Automation Tools to Help Treatment of Tumors

Tumors are often linked to cancer when they become malignant and start to spread. Doctors and researchers throughout the world are continuously seeking better ways to diagnose and treat tumors early on, thus preventing severe damage. In a rare interdisciplinary study, engineers from the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, have stepped up to help doctors in treating tumors. Prof. Radhakant Padhi from the Department of Aerospace Engineering and his team has designed an automation tool for slow and controlled drug release. It is an intelligent feedback algorithm that can be embedded in a micro-controller and effective in treating solid tumors with minimal side effects.

Scientists Design a Cooling System for Spacecraft Entering the Martian Atmosphere

With the invention of telescopes in the 17th century, astronomers around the globe started studying the planets of the Solar system. Several spacecraft have been sent to the planet for exploration including orbiters, landers and rovers, with the recent ones being NASA’s MAVEN and Indian Space Research Organization’s MOM. The biggest challenge faced by the spacecraft on such expeditions is the heat generated due to its speed. Now, scientists at the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, are experimenting with a new technology that can help in faster dissipation of the heat in spacecraft entering the Martian atmosphere.

Taking Swachh Bharat Abhiyan to aircrafts

A lot of noise has been created about waste generation and management - numerous campaigns, volunteering and even our very own Swachh Bharat Abhiyan. These efforts focus about the waste generated on land. But what happens to the waste generated on air? Two alumni from the Indian Institute of Science, Mohit Gupta and Darshan Seshagiri along with Aarohi Bhavinbhai Shah, all currently studying at Georgia Tech, have thought of an excellent way to do this. This innovation helped them win the prestigious Innovation Showdown 2016 title.

Link the Top: Retaining the best talent in aerospace industry

Almost everyone, as a kid, has always been fascinated with sky and flying. But somewhere in between, that dream is forgotten and busy lives take over. However, even those who choose to pursue aerospace engineering as a career are eventually attracted by more lucrative opportunities in the other areas. In an attempt to reverse this trend, Airbus has joined hands with the best aerospace engineering schools across the globe, and started a novel initiative, aptly named 'Link the Top.'

IISc start-up may bring cutting-edge aerospace research to engineering colleges

A start-up founded by researchers from the Indian Institute of Science promises to bring cutting-edge aerospace research to engineering colleges. Super-Wave Technology Pvt. Ltd., a company incubated in IISc, aims to commercialise its patented invention - a miniature version of 'shock tube' and 'hypersonic shock tunnel'. Apart from this, the company also wants to explore socially relevant applications of shock waves - a thin region of extremely high temperature, defined by dramatic variations in pressure and density. Shock waves, commonly encountered by fast flying aircraft and missiles, are created when an object moves faster than sound.

Shock wave treatment to get rid of infections

We have all heard of Concorde aircrafts, which can fly faster than sound. When flying at max speed, these aircrafts generate what is called a 'shock wave' – a kind of disturbance that occurs in nature when a body is moving faster than sound. Imagine the high energy generated! Now imagine harnessing that energy to kill off micro-organisms.

The Laboratory for Hypersonic and Shock Wave Research, IISc

“In this lab, we recreate the same conditions as a capsule reentering the Earth’s atmosphere. We generate these conditions in the lab for not more than one or two milliseconds. The data from these tests are used to design better space crafts and fundamentally study the shock wave’s structure and characteristics,” explains Dr. Jagadeesh.

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